Human Rights

BMUN 5 Human Rights Committee Briefing

 1. The Question of Improving Maternal Healthcare

Key Facts

  • The problem of Maternal Healthcare goal five of the MDGs. Maternal health care a mean feature in Southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa; their maternal mortality risk being 1 in 30, compared to 1 in 5,600 in developed regions.
  • 350,000 women die annually from complications during pregnancy or childbirth, almost all of them — 99 per cent — in developing countries.
  • More than 80 per cent of these deaths can usually be easily avoided as they are often a result of preventable and treatable implications.
  • At least 20% of the burden of disease in children below the age of 5 is related to poor maternal health and nutrition, as well as quality of care at the time of delivery and during the new-born period.
  • Yearly 8 million babies die before or during delivery or in the first week of life. Further, many children are tragically left motherless each year. These children are 10 times more likely to die within two years of their mothers’ death.
  • The risk of maternal mortality is highest for adolescent girls and increases with each pregnancy, yet progress on family planning has stalled and funding has not kept pace with demand. With only limited access to contraception and information there is also the increased rick due to multiple pregnancies and childbearing at younger ages.

Solutions

  • About 215 million women who would prefer to delay or avoid having childbearing lack access to safe and effective contraception. It is estimated that meeting the unmet needs for contraception could cut, by almost a third, the number of maternal deaths.
  • Although this goal has been put into place it is making the least progression. Look at both the healthcare during and after labour for both the mother and the child
  • Increasing the number of skilled midwifes and nurses to help deliver and look after both the mother and baby, before, during and after the pregnancy.
  • Reinforce some the solutions devised as part of the MGS, putting pressure on countries who are not reaching their targets.

Useful Links

 

2. The Question of Human Rights in the Digital and Online Realm

Key Facts

  • Nearly 2 billion people use the internet, including those that access it on their mobile devices such as mobile phones, Ipad’s. The number is ever increasing.
  • With increasing technology it has become easier to access the internet.
  • Children from the age of 5 are now using the internet.
  • The Information Security Advisory Group estimates that world-wide there are now some 100,000 hackers.
  • It is believed that there are around 20,000 different computer viruses in existence, many of them placed on the Internet deliberately to cause confusion or damage.
  • Internet fraud refers to the use of Internet services or software with Internet access to defraud victims or to otherwise take advantage of them, for example by stealing personal information, which can even lead to identity theft.

Solutions

  • Increased awareness of the potential dangers online.
  • Resolution 59 of the UN General Assembly adopted in 1946, as well as by Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948), which states that the fundamental right of freedom of expression encompasses the freedom to “to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers. Update this resolution to accommodate the newer issues that have arisen from the digital realm.
  • Everybody has the right to privacy, there should be more preventions put into place to deter and prevent the right from being breached.
  • The IPDC (International Program for the Development of communication) is the only multilateral forum in the UN system designed to mobilize the international community to discuss and promote media development in developing countries. This is as part of the human right of Freedom of Information.
  • Further to a call for proposals launched in 2005, the Bureau of the Intergovernmental Council for IFAP (Information for All Program) has received more than 500 project proposals for funding from organizations all over the world.
  • In the UK, the Malicious Communications Act 1988 makes it an offence to send letters with the intent to cause distress or anxiety. Amendments were made to the Act in 2001 to include e-mails and text messages. Protecting people’s Right to Privacy.

Useful Links

 

Leave a Reply